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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Nov 29, 2012 1:00am PST
off the fiscal cliff because both sides decide to push brinksmanship beyond the brink. >> susie: honeywell has a lot of defense contracts, and if you go over the fiscal cliff, one of the first areas that will be cut drastically is defense. how are you preparing for that possibility? >> we've been planning for a couple of years about defense reductions, because we thought that is one the things that is going to have to happen. just being on the simpson bowle commission, getting a sense of how bad things are. there is an impact that is occurring across the company, and i think across other companies, about this uncertainty, can i guy still governor. i really stped external hiring about june. i was only hire back 100 or 200 a month, so we steadily worked our census down. that helps contribute to a troubled economy. >> susie: you don't feel the way that warren buffett does, who was saying that the fiscal cliff has nothing to do with his investment decisions. you're feeling much of of more of an impact on your day-to-day business? >> i'm looking more am i going to continue to grow outside of the u.s. or invest in my facilities in the u.s. in the main, that's still true, but you can't just act like everything is f
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 4:30pm PST
fiscal cliff the biggest concern for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningful federal deficit reduction is likely to lower state funding, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply managemens purchasing magers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff saut says investors seem to be ignoring bad news, and this is a bullish sign. he's managing director and chief investment strategist at raymond james. so jeff, not only are you bullish but you're also calling for a pretty decent santa claus rally. tell us why? >> well, i have learned over the 42 years in this business, susie, that it's pretty tough to put stocks to the downside in the ebullient month of december. i mean it's happened but it's a pretty rare event it just seems to be the holiday sentiment tend to its lift stocks. i think that is what will happen this kror because i'm not one that thinks we'll fall totally off the
WETA
Dec 5, 2012 6:30pm EST
fiscal cliff. you mentioned it earlier, businesses planning for consumer confidence to go off that cliff if we go off it as a country. do you not agree with that prospect? >> well, no. i believe it will -- if nothing happens and there is no agreement, i think there will be a mild, kind of technical recession in the first half of next year. maybe a 1% decline contraction for both the first and second quarter. but i don't think it will do very much fundamental damage underneath that. it will kind of reduce the base from which spending grows, but once that base is down slightly, i think the growth will continue. >> tom: real quick, is it going to continue for housing and autos, do you think? >> yes. those are the two key things that in the past have really driven recoveries. they haven't for the last three years because housing was part of the crisis, and consumers didn't want to borrow to buy cars. but now i think that is coming back. and that is going to drive the recovery, more like what we're used to. >> tom: a little bit of a tail wind. bob baur along with us, he is with principl
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 1:00am PST
." >> susie: the fiscal cliff talks are going nowhere. that's the word from john boehner today. the house speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: the president is proposing to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insurance benefits and the payroll tax cut. republicans literally laughed it off. >> they want... they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing t
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 4:30pm PST
republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not ique to citi; it's indtry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)